Dear Internet, Your Cookies are a Lie

This is the beginning of something good. Mmmmm…cookies!

This is the beginning of something good. Mmmmm…cookies!

If I accept one more cookie, it damn well better have chocolate chips.

I am a UX designer with experience in the privacy space. And all these cookie banners are crazy-making. Especially the claims about 'giving you a better experience.'

FastCompany    is going to improve your experience by spying on you, then predicting your future behaviour. What’s not to like?

FastCompany is going to improve your experience by spying on you, then predicting your future behaviour. What’s not to like?

Adobe is going to ‘enhance your browsing experience.’ Sounds great!

If you are new to the idea of cookies on websites, let me summarize them for you. They are a tracking device.

Cookies are used to record your behaviour so businesses can have better analytics. This slows down their websites, erodes your privacy, and fills up space on your devices. But it helps them sell you more things.

Is this really a better experience? Probably not, unless you own the business in question.

Invision gives you some choices if your IP address hails from Europe.

Invision did this right! Imagine if everything were this clear. Have to live in Europe to have the privilege of this kind of choice, though.

Product people: until we can design better solutions that do a better job at privacy, let's at least be a bit more honest. In the meantime, it’s been a while since breakfast and I’m getting hungry—so I will be accepting actual cookies ;)


NOTE: We recognize the importance of good analytics to digital businesses. And we also use a cookie to tell apart repeat vs. new site visitors. On this very site. As you read this. So if you work for Adobe, Fast Company, or some other company that relies on tracking technology for marketing funnels—maybe we can work together on something better. Take a quick minute and say hi.